Moonstones

Moonstones

moonstone necklace#5530


Moonstones are pretty versatile for secondary birthstones and anniversaries.
Amethysts and pearls may be the usual birthstones for February and June, but many people choose the moonstone instead.
Moonstone is used to celebrate a 13th wedding anniversary.

The best source of moonstones is Ceylon (Sri Lanka), but they are found in many different countries around the world. The
quality of the stones from different sources may vary, so read below carefully, to learn what to look for in your moonstone
jewelry.

Priced affordably, moonstones play a part in legends and mythology dating back to the most ancient cultures. They and the
antique jewels that are set with moonstones are highly sought after today.

                             #6344moonstone snake ring

The most outstanding quality of the moonstone is its mystical, milky shimmer. This ethereal moonlike quality is what gives
 the stone its name.
Moonstones have been revered by cultures through the centuries from the Ancient Romans onwards. Hindus believed that
moonstones were made of solidified
moonbeams. Romans believed that they were formed from drops of moonlight. It is told that as late as the 20th century,
George Kunz (after whom kunzite was named and who was the gemologist for LC Tiffany) described the changing qualities of a
moonstone in moonlight.
It comes as no surprise that moonstones have always been associated with love and other mystical qualities. Romance,
passion, healing, fertility foreteller of the future, bringer of good luck are just some of the attributes of this simple
and fairly common gemstone. Many attributes, like the moon, are related to women and the subconscious.
When we think of travelers of old, we envisage a horse-rider galloping along by the light of the moon or a lady,
enveloped in her cloak, riding her carriage by the same moonlight. It therefore comes as no surprise that moonstones
were believed to protect travelers against the dangers of travel.

                                                             #5531 Raymond Yard moonstone brooch

Some of the worlds’ greatest jewelers had high regard for moonstones. Both Rene Lalique and Louis Comfort Tiffany,
like the Arts and Crafts jewelers before them, loved including moonstones in their beautiful settings. It's not so much
the value of the moonstone itself, but the jewel that was created from the moonstone that commands such a high price in
many cases. You can find a cheap moonstone cabochon for under $100.00 but a similar gem in a beautiful antique setting
made by Rene Lalique or Louis Tiffany is a totally different story.

Moonstones are almost always cut as cabochons.
The most desirable form is a man-in-the-moon face, which can command exceedingly high prices.
#4141 Halley’s Comet with Man in the Moon Face.

Halley's Comet moonstone


Moonstones may range in color from almost entirely transparent to fairly opaque. They may be almost milky white
or show tinges of color. Look for the shimmering blue light seeming to float above the stone. Before buying a moonstone,
move it about and look at it from different angles.

Once you have bought your moonstone jewel, remember that it is fairly soft, so be careful not to knock it or damage it by
storing it carelessly.

Please email antiques@brendaginsberg.com with questions and find jewelry on www.brendaginsberg.com

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